Complete Guide on Automation Testing: Types, Applications, and Techniques

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Automation Testing is a technique developed to solve a problem when it becomes difficult to manually test an application by filling out various input fields. Soon enough, the testers were exhausted, and their focus began to waver, which led to bugs that were left unchecked. You can learn more about Automation and its tools by enrolling in Automation Testing Training offered by a reputed institute. In this article, let us look at some of the important concepts of Automation Testing.

Type of Automation testing

There are two primary categories, functional and non-functional, which are as follows:

  • Functional testing is a type of software testing that simulates actual situations that occur in a business setting. At a basic minimum, a ride-sharing app like Uber must be able to link end customers with drivers when all circumstances are met. This is one of the app’s primary responsibilities.
  • Testing that is not functional verifies that the software meets all of its other requirements (for example, performance, security, data storage, etc.) In the context of the ride-sharing service, this kind of testing will verify that the application is quick and effective when carrying out its most fundamental duties, such as, in this scenario, linking end users with drivers.

Various types of testing

Aside from the sorts of automation testing, Smoke Tests, Integration Tests, Regression Tests, Security Tests, Performance Tests, Acceptance Tests, etc., are also common in the field of test automation. You can learn about all these tests in an Automation Testing Training program.

  • Smoke Tests: Smoke tests are a form of Functional test that only cover the essential components of a software solution. This ensures that the software solution can be further evaluated without “catching fire,” which is where the term “Smoke Tests” comes from.
  • Integration Tests: Integration tests take all of the separate components and features of a software solution and test them together to ensure seamless operation between all of the components and features.

When doing regression tests, functional and non-functional tests are run to determine whether or not the software has “regressed” due to a particular change.

  • Security Tests: Security tests include functional and non-functional tests that examine a piece of software to determine whether or not it contains any vulnerabilities. They expose any vulnerabilities and opportunities for exploits within a system.
  • Performance Tests: Performance tests are frequently non-functional tests that assist testers in evaluating criteria such as responsiveness and stability as the software deals with load and stress.
  • Acceptance Tests: Acceptance tests are functional tests that determine whether or not the end-users will find the product acceptable. This is the last test that a solution needs to pass for it to be considered ready for release.

Testing Phases

Unit: As its name suggests, this phase’s objective is to evaluate the software’s components, also known as units. Unit testing is the initial software testing phase and is often performed manually by developers before handing off the product to testers. Nevertheless, unit testing can also be performed automatically.

Interface Programming Application:  Also known as API, it acts as a “middleman” between your software’s various systems. Therefore, it is tested after the complete development process to guarantee that the various software and hardware components integrate seamlessly. This testing phase is extremely flexible; it may be performed before or after the UI phase, which we shall discuss in a moment, and either the testing team or the development team may conduct it.

User Interface: The User Interface, or UI, is the portion of a product that end users see and interact with. Consequently, UI testing often occurs near the conclusion of the development phase. After the program’s user interface (UI) has been built, testers will proceed to this testing phase to ensure the most accurate replication of the user experience is feasible. This portion of the testing procedure investigates and optimizes the business logic of the software, which is also categorized as a Functional test.

Automated frameworks for testing automation

After determining the types of automated testing required for a project, an automation test framework is selected to assist testers in organizing and standardizing the process. Standardization’s benefits are clearly apparent in a variety of scenarios. To make projects more accessible to newcomers, which helps teams scale, it is vital to have a comprehensive framework and set of principles.

Types of structure

There are numerous frames from which to choose, but here are some of the most common.

  • The linear framework, often known as the record-and-playback framework, is the simplest framework type. Record and playback refer to the procedure by which testers develop and execute a test script for each test case. This procedure is comparable to filming and displaying a video clip. It is most suitable for use by novices in test automation and smaller teams due to its ease of use.
  • As the name implies, Modular Based Framework breaks each test case into smaller sections known as modules, which run separately. The “master script” will then handle the modules of each scenario consistently, saving testers considerable time and optimizing their workflow.

Framework for the Architecture of the Library

The Library Architecture Framework was constructed on top of the Modular Framework, which has some advantages over the latter. This framework does not separate the test case into distinct sections; rather, it groups similar tasks within the test script into functions and then puts the functions in a library. Because these functions are comprised of activities that all work toward the same objectives, the test script can utilize them anytime a functionality is required. This type of architecture enables even greater reusability and flexibility in testing.

Conclusion

We hope that this quick introduction to the various forms of automated testing and the many different frameworks for test automation has given you a better knowledge of test automation. While this overview could be more thorough, it does cover a lot of ground. You may even give some of the frameworks/tests highlighted on this page a shot and see whether they live up to your expectations.

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